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Death Photo of Ernie Pyle


Pyle was a war correspondent from WWII.  He was admired by rank and file, generals and public.  He died on Okinawa when a jeep he was riding in came under machine gun fire.  All scrambled for cover.  Ernie raised his head and caught a .30 caliber bullet, killing him instantly. Ernie Pyle

The photo has never been published and is a recent discovery.  Those who have studied Pyle were surprised by the discovery.  Below is the news release of his death. 

A story about the photos discovery can be viewed at this site.

“COMMAND POST, IE SHIMA, April 18 (AP)—Ernie Pyle, war correspondent beloved by his co-workers, GIs and generals alike, was killed by a Japanese machine-gun bullet through his left temple this morning …”

The news stunned a nation still mourning the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt six days earlier. Callers besieged newspaper switchboards. “Ernie is mourned by the Army,” said soldier-artist Bill Mauldin, whose droll, irreverent GI cartoons had made him nearly as famous as Pyle.

He was right; even amid heavy fighting, Pyle’s death was a prime topic among the troops.

“If I had not been there to see it, I would have taken with a grain of salt any report that the GI was taking Ernie Pyle’s death `hard,’ but that is the only word that best describes the universal reaction out here,” Army photographer Alexander Roberts wrote to Lee Miller, a friend of Ernie and his first biographer.

But Ernie Pyle was not just any reporter. He was a household name during World War II and for years afterward. From 1941 until his death, Pyle riveted the nation with personal, straight-from-the-heart tales about hometown soldiers in history’s greatest conflict.

In 1944, his columns for Scripps-Howard Newspapers earned a Pulitzer Prize and Hollywood made a movie, “Ernie Pyle’s Story of G.I. Joe,” starring Burgess Meredith as the slender, balding 44-year-old reporter.

Typically self-effacing, Pyle insisted the film include fellow war correspondents playing themselves. But he was killed before it was released.

In April 1945, the one-time Indiana farm boy had just arrived in the Pacific after four years of covering combat in North Africa, Italy and France. With Germany on the verge of surrender, he wanted to see the war to its end, but confided to colleagues that he didn’t expect to survive.

At Okinawa he found U.S. forces battling entrenched Japanese defenders while “kamikaze” suicide pilots wreaked carnage on the Allied fleet offshore.

On April 16, the Army’s 77th Infantry Division landed on Ie Shima, a small island off Okinawa, to capture an airfield. Although a sideshow to the main battle, it was “warfare in its worst form,” photographer Roberts wrote later. “Not one Japanese soldier surrendered, he killed until he was killed.”

On the third morning, a jeep carrying Pyle and three officers came under fire from a hidden machine gun. All scrambled for cover in roadside ditches, but when Pyle raised his head, a .30 caliber bullet caught him in the left temple, killing him instantly.

Roberts and two other photographers, including AP’s Grant MacDonald, were at a command post 300 yards away when Col. Joseph Coolidge, who had been with Pyle in the jeep, reported what happened.

Roberts went to the scene, and despite continuing enemy fire, crept forward—a “laborious, dirt-eating crawl,” he later called it—to record the scene with his Speed Graphic camera. His risky act earned Roberts a Bronze Star medal for valor.

Pyle was first buried among soldiers on Ie Shima. In 1949 his body was moved to the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific at Punchbowl Crater, near Honolulu.

Roberts’ photograph, however, was never seen by the public. He told Miller the War Department had withheld it “out of deference” to Ernie’s ailing widow, Jerry.

“It was so peaceful a death … that I felt its reproduction would not be in bad taste,” he said, “but there probably would be another school of thought on this.”

 

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